Want to receive our monthly newsletters and Legislative Updates directly in your inbox? Sign up here!

This is my first test post

Just testing!

Share

Party Tricks

Money, as we all know, makes the world go round, or so the saying goes. I’ve spent a great deal of time trying to figure out money, and it still remains largely a mystery to me. I remember reading somewhere that if you aren’t confused about money then you haven’t thought enough about it. Money is useful as a store of value and as a unit of exchange that we can trade with each other, and all ventures need it.

Read more
Share

Growth gives P.E.I. Green Party hope for a harvest in 2019 election

Originally published in the Guardian by Mitch MacDonald, June 11, 2017: http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/news/local/2017/6/11/growth-gives-p-e-i--green-party-hope-for-a-harvest-in-2019-elect.html

Anna__Peter__Jordan_M_at_Spring_Conference_2017_-_Guardian.jpgThe Green Party of P.E.I. was busy planting some seeds of support this weekend with hopes of a big harvest during a 2019 provincial election.

Creating district associations, growing grassroots support and preparing to campaign were some of the topics party members focused on during a spring conference in Emerald this weekend.

Party president Anna Keenan said the conference’s goal was to put down roots for future success and build on the party’s recent surge in support.

“The challenge for us is to make sure the growth we’re currently experiencing isn’t a boom and bust. We don’t want to be a flash in the pan so we’re trying to grow gradually and sustainably in line with our values,” said Keenan, noting the goal is to eventually form a Green government in P.E.I. “We have no illusions about how hard that would be to achieve but we’re hearing from more Islanders that is something they like to dream about.”

Read more
Share

Ch-ch-ch-ch changes

My favourite David Bowie song is “Changes” – a catchy tune, brilliant lyrics, raunchy sax solo, and hidden meanings galore. I saw Bowie live in 1983, and it remains one of the most amazing concerts I’ve ever attended. Life sometimes unfolds in unexpected and testing ways: my last blog was written before Bowie died, and before the most recent session of the PEI Legislature opened. It is now three weeks since the House closed, and, to quote the song – “time has changed me.”

Read more
Share

House renovations

It’s been two weeks since the PEI Legislature closed for the summer, and as some distance opens up between the peculiar environment which exists inside the rail and more normal life on the outside, it feels like a good time to reflect on the spring sitting - and political life generally - in all its glory and oddness.

After two full years and five legislative sittings, I feel that I understand my new workplace much better - which is different from saying I am comfortable there.

Read more
Share

The Truth about the Mental Health System on PEI

whackamole.jpgIt has been a stormy few months on the Island.  Someone I spoke to recently likened it to a game of Whack-A-Mole.   It’s almost frenetic as Islanders risk being vulnerable and speak up about challenges they have faced with their mental health, or a family member’s mental health, and their experiences in the health system.   And as practitioners in health speak out in frustration.  And as politicians offer solutions that may calm the storm, but don’t help navigate out of it.     

Read more
Share

The age of enlightenment?

Not that I needed to be reminded of this fact, but last week once again demonstrated that politics is an unpredictable animal. The simple – at least on the surface – idea of reducing the voting age from 18 to 16 created a debate that has clearly stirred up a lot more controversy than I ever imagined when we decided to introduce the private member’s bill following the plebiscite last year when 16 and 17 year-olds were allowed to vote for the first time in Canada.

Read more
Share

Doing Budgets Differently - What really matters?

PEI_heart_map.jpgBeing fiscally responsible is socially responsible.  As the special edition of The Guardian (April 6) dramatically demonstrated, poverty is a huge issue in PEI with 15.8% of Islanders classified as low income. The reality for too many Islanders is that our social systems are not meeting their needs, and band aid solutions are not going to be enough. We are not meeting our obligations to our citizens if we are not providing basic and equitable quality of life to all – and that requires a commitment to fiscal policy that is different, but not radical.

Read more
Share

Bandaid Solutions

bandaid.jpgEvents on PEI lately have me thinking about bandaids.  You know - we’ve all had that experience of being in a hurry, not preparing well or safely, not thinking of possible consequences - the knife slips and we cut a finger.   We grab a bandaid, stem the bloody flow and chastise ourselves for being so careless.

But the thing is, more often than not, the bandaid doesn’t stick don’t you find?  It gets wet and falls off, it is on an awkward joint and falls off when we use that finger, or it just isn’t good enough quality to stick.

 

Read more
Share

The fable of the Finance Minister who cried wolf

Do you remember the story of the boy who cried wolf? He kept telling those around him that a wolf was about to eat his flock of sheep, but when they went to check, there was nothing there. Eventually they stopped paying attention, assuming that he was having them on, until one day the wolf actually showed up, but no-one was listening.

Finance Minister Allen Roach has been promising, literally EVERY year since he took on the position, that we will reach balance, and have a surplus …… next year. For a while, people may have believed him, but consistent annual disappointment at budget time has led many folks to roll their eyes and think - as those repeatedly misled by the boy who cried wolf – that he’s deluded.

Read more
Share